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Claesson Koivisto Rune

Architecture & design studio Claesson Koivisto Rune was founded in Stockholm in 1995 by Mårten Claesson, Eero Koivisto and Ola Rune, after the three had graduated together from Stockholm's University College of Arts, Crafts and Design.

Started as an architectural office, but soon became multidisciplinary, in architectural and design.Amongst their projects are houses such as the Sfera building in Kyoto, the Swedish Ambassador’s residence in Berlin, Ingegerd Råman house and studio, Kjell A Nordströms residence, Sony Music headquarter in Stockholm, One Happy Cloud restaurant, Gucci Stockholm, Louis Vuitton Stockholm, Scandinavian Airlines Euroshop, Asplund shop.

International companies such as Almedahls, Ateljé Lyktan, Asplund, Boffi, Cappellini, David design, Dune, E&Y, Franc franc, Iren Uffici, Living Divani, Nola, Offect, Skandiform, Swedese are just some of the studio's many prominent design clients.

Their works have earned numerous awards, and been extensively exhibited and publicized worldwide.

Claesson Koivisto Rune
Claesson Koivisto Rune

CLAESSON KOIVISTO RUNE ON THEIR DESIGN PHILOSOPHY
"Being both designers and architects at the same time, we tend to look at design as always a part of a greater spatial context. This multidisciplinary approach is typical for the Scandinavian tradition and adds cross-inspiration to our work in both the small and the bigger scale."

CLAESSON KOIVISTO RUNE ON NEW NORDIC DESIGN
"What's worth pointing out about the Scandinavian designers of the 50's and 60's is the strong bond between architecture and design. In that respect we try to do the same thing. Design today is international. Perhaps more than ever before. And it resonates around the globe. The Scandinavian design scene of today is full of momentum; full of talent. Hopefully this can inspire other designers in other places."

Claesson Koivisto Rune
Claesson Koivisto Rune
Claesson Koivisto Rune

This article is part of the Nordic Design: Now & Then series.
Swedish Fashion Designer Sandra Backlund

Sandra Backlund is a Swedish fashion designer specializing in sculptural knitwear. Graduating from Beckmans College of Design in Stockholm in 2004, Backlund set up her own eponymous label that same year. Since then she has won many awards and accolades, In 2007 Backlund was the Grand Prix Winner of the Festival International de Monde & Photographie In Hyeres, France. In 2010 she won the Swedish Elle Award and in 2009 won NewGen sponsorship from The British Fashion Council. Backlund also won the admiration of the international fashion community, collaborating with Louis Vuitton (A/W 2007) and Emilio Pucci (A/W 2009) on several knitwear pieces for their collections in addition to being selected as a protege by Italian Vogue's Franca Sozzani on the Protege Project in 2008 and again in 2009 for the Cittadelarte Fashion B.E.S.T. project. In 2010 Backlund launched her first solo collection, her Spring/Summer 2011 collection marks the third collection that has went into production.

Backlund's design aesthetic is sculptural, architectural and dynamic. Striving to exaggerate and accentuate the female form, Backlund fluctuates proportions, producing designs that are simultaneously sci-fi and warm, as she works with heavy wool, paper and more recently hair. By fusing futuristic design with tactile and familiar materials Backlund has manged to transform the very meaning of knitwear into a piece of sculpture, a piece of moving art. Backlund approaches her work in a manner akin to an artisan. Instead of creating her garments by using traditional patterns, she designs whilst knitting, producing a more organic and streamlined result. Keen to immerse herself in her work, Backlund knits for unprecedented hours in her Stockholm studio, but has accepted that she can not produce an entire collection by herself and now incorporates machine techniques in addition to looking into focusing on accessories or collaborating with an Italian knitwear specialist to ensure her clothes become more commercially available.

This article is part of the Nordic Design: Now & Then series.

Swedish Fashion Designer Sandra Backlund
Swedish Fashion Designer Sandra Backlund
Swedish Fashion Designer Sandra Backlund
Swedish Fashion Designer Sandra Backlund
Swedish Fashion Designer Sandra Backlund
Swedish Fashion Designer Sandra Backlund
Noma- World's Best Restaurant

Voted the world's best restaurant for 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2014 by the San Pellegrino World’s 50 Best Restaurant awards, Noma is a two Michelin star restaurant run by chef René Redzepi and Claus Meyer in Copenhagen, Denmark. The name being a contraction of two Danish words nordisk mad, or Nordic food. René Redzepi and Noma have reversed the direction of food creativity, insisting that nature, and the exploration of nature should be the foundation of cooking. Known for using foraging techniques to find his produce, and only using ingredients found on Nordic countries, Redzepi is considered to be the founder of the Nordic Cuisine movement. Redzepi operates at the cutting edge of gourmet cuisine, combining an unrelenting creativity and a remarkable level of craftsmanship with an inimitable and innate knowledge of the produce of his Nordic terroir.

Each dinner at Noma is introduces to Nordic cuisine via its inimitable series of 20 servings that include the likes of sea urchin toast and caramelised milk and cod liver, before the meal is rounded off with a stunning array of ‘treats’. Redzepi’s food can at times be shocking – visceral even – but diners who are prepared to put themselves in the kitchen’s hands rarely leave disappointed. With flavour to the fore, there are dishes here that slap you in the face and make you feel glad to be alive.

Noma- World's Best Restaurant
Noma- World's Best Restaurant

Housed in an old warehouse converted building, the restaurant's interior is re-designed by Space Copenhagen. The original interior of taupe, cream and brown hues has been replaced by a muted, slick white, grey and black colour scheme. A new oak floor has been laid, along with a new bar and a new, brick wall running through the restaurant. The biggest change is to the lounge area, which has a cosier, "more Nordic", feel. "”It is as if the restaurant has moved 1000 kilometres north," according to chef René Redzepi.

Noma- World's Best Restaurant
Noma- World's Best Restaurant
Noma- World's Best Restaurant

The chairs and tables in the restaurant are the same design as in the original Noma, but the surfaces and colours have been changed. In the lounge the furniture is all new featuring the new Ren Chair and Sofa recently designed by Space Copenhagen "We felt a great importance in protecting the honest, earthy feel of the restaurant and balancing it with refinement of detail and elegance,” says Space Copenhagen's Peter Bundgaard Rützou and Signe Bindslev Henriksen. “It was very much about using organic materials such as wood, stone, eather, brass and linen in a new way; materials that age beautifully over time.”

Never content to sit still, Redzepi and his crew are shipping the restaurant out to Japan in early 2015 for two months, where they will seek to apply their philosophy to Japanese ingredients.

This article is part of the Nordic Design: Now & Then series.

Noma- World's Best Restaurant
Noma- World's Best Restaurant
Noma- World's Best Restaurant
Noma- World's Best Restaurant
Norway's New Banknotes

In 2014, Norges Bank held a competition for the re-design of Norway new banknotes. The purpose of the competition was to arrive at a proposal that can be the artistic basis of the new banknote series and communicate the theme "The Sea" in an appropriate manner. 

Norway's New Banknotes
Norway's New Banknotes

Eight teams were selected for the final round. And the jury have concluded that two proposals stand out- Beauty of Boundaries by Snøhetta Design, and Norwegian Living Space by The Metric System and Terje Tønnessen. 

The front-side of the new Norweigan krone banknote will features design from The Metric System, Norwegian Living Space while the reverse sides will be the pixel motifs submitted by Snøhetta Design, Beauty of Boundaries. The design from The Metric System are very well suited to the incorporation of necessary security elements. The expression is open, light and typically Nordic. Using the pixel motifs from Snøhetta Design as the reverse will give the notes both a traditional and a modern expression. 

While the new kroners are cool, Norges Bank pointed out that the new banknote will only made available in 2017 at the earliest. The motifs and designs may “differ somewhat” from the proposals, as security and machine-readable elements are introduced into the banknotes.

This article is part of the Nordic Design: Now & Then series.

Norway's New Banknotes
Norway's New Banknotes
Norway's New Banknotes
Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506

54 years after the SAS Royal hotel's (now Radisson Blu Royal Hotel) iconic Room 606 by Arne Jacobsen, furniture maker Fritz Hansen asked the world-renowned Spanish designer Jaime Hayon to create a total design for Room 506 to match Arne Jacobsen’s Room 606.

Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506

Room 506 is created with great respect for Arne Jacobsen’s original design from 1958. It is different from Room 606, but the kinship is unmistakable. Jaime Hayon is clearly inspired by the classic Arne Jacobsen palette of subtle colours with a few well-placed bright accents. And like Arne Jacobsen, Jaime Hayon has created a total design for the room, including furniture, works of art, bedspreads, lamps etc. A range of existing Hayon designs for Fritz Hansen including the ‘Favn’ sofa, ‘Analog’ table and ‘Ro’ easy chair are complemented by a number of accessories such as a statement low-hanging ball light, lamps, cabinet, mirror and vase.

Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506
Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506

Another strong link between Room 506 and 606 is the Drop chair, which has been a sleeping beauty for the past 50 years. Although the Drop chair was originally used both in the cocktail bar and in all the rooms, today it is only found in Rooms 606 and 506. The Drop was originally produced along with the Swan and the Egg, but it was created exclusively for the hotel and was never put into standard production. This year it is back in production and available to the public for the first time. Jaime Hayon has given the Drop a new, sophisticated upholstery, which lends the chair a different expression and makes a perfect match for the beauty and the ambience of Room 506. Together with all the other furniture it beautifies the room and gives it a touch of Nordic aesthetic.

Room 506 can be rented for EURO 735 per night.

Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506
Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506
Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506
Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506
Jaime Hayon SAS Royal Hotel Room 506
House RIIHI by OOPEAA

This private residence in Alajärvi, Finland was completed in 2014, and was designed by OOPEAA (Office for Peripheral Architecture) 

From the architects: 

The building is located in Alajärvi, a small village in eastern Ostrobothnia in Finland, in a valley-like area next to a small island of forest on the side of a farm field. It was commissioned by a family of an entrepreneur father, an artist mother and two sons, who needed a house with spaces to live in accompanied with spaces for their hobbies and a studio to serve as an atelier. 

The house blends in with the surrounding landscape through its shape and materials. The composition subtly recalls the feeling of a traditional Finnish farm, in which wooden cottages were arranged so as to form a protected inner courtyard with the buildings facing the courtyard. In this case, the three buildings, the house, the atelier and the garage, give shape to an intimate garden, creating an optimal microclimate around the house by minimizing the impact of the northerly winds blowing in the valley.

House RIIHI by OOPEAA
House RIIHI by OOPEAA

Being a low energy building, the L-shaped house is made of wood in its exterior, interior and frame, with large pitched roofs clad in aluminum reflecting the landscape in an unexpected way. Compressed wood has been used for insulation and paper has been used for sealing. All metal parts in the building are made of untreated aluminum. Materials and technical solutions create a healthy and ecological building which can be recycled when it reaches the end of its life cycle. The entity can be heated with its four heat retaining fireplaces which also provide hot water for the house. The lighting system in the house is supplied with batteries charged with solar power. It is possible to live in the house without being dependent on the power grid and water and drainage grids. 

The interiors are arranged according to three different functions into areas with each their own atmosphere. The garage and hobby space is very simple and has a sense of anonymity to its interior surfaces. The atelier has very high ceilings and its wooden surfaces, even floors, are painted white in order to make the light as even as possible. The interiors in the house, furnished and cladded in radially sawn spruce, provide a warm and cozy atmosphere. Its dwellers can enjoy the spacious living room and its central fireplace, climb on the mezzanine to contemplate the view over the fields, and use the large and furnished corridors as a play area or reading room, overlooking the inner yard through their wide openings.

House RIIHI by OOPEAA
House RIIHI by OOPEAA
House RIIHI by OOPEAA
House RIIHI by OOPEAA

This article is part of the Nordic Design: Now & Then series.
Nordic Embassy Complex Berlin

The Nordic countries embassies at Berlin share one of the world’s most architecturally unique buildings. Rather than each country building a separate entity the Scandinavian nations decided to create a single complex to house their local representation. The five Nordic nations, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden jointly develop the embasy building which consist of five nations building and one common building enclosed by a band of copper, corresponded to the fundamental idea of national individuality and the unity of Nordic countries. 

Berger + Parkkinen were commissioned to design the Common Building, a place for cultural exchange and information, the copper band, the landscaping and the underground facilities. The complex is enclosed on three sides by a gently curving, green copper clad wall 15 meters high and almost 230 meters long. The copper band, a sum of copper lamellas mounted on a stainless steel construction, encloses the six buildings as a continuous and autonomous element. The angles at which the copper lamellas are inclined control the amount of permeability for light, view and air. The band wraps the embassy buildings yet only touches parts of them. In some cases it completes courtyards, flowing freely across some distances.

The entire wall is comprised of almost four thousand louvers that fold open at strategic points to bring natural light to the interior rooms and courtyards. The southern side is left open with just a glass wall to provide security. Views in to the courtyard are unobstructed and showcase the six individual structures housed within. Materials local to Scandinavia are prevalent in all the buildings’ designs with the Norwegian embassy standing out with its 4 story tall 120 tonne, solid granite slab. 

Five of the buildings are the individual embassies of the Nordic countries – Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Finland – organized in their geographic arrangement. Water features are located between the pavilions to symbolize the connecting seas between the countries. The sixth structure becomes a communal space offering open access to the public and housing a cafe, gallery space, events hall, lecture rooms, and other facilities. 

Each embasy is done by their respective appointed architect: Denmark by 3xN Architects; Finland by Viiva arkkitehtuuri Oy; Iceland by Pálmar Kristmundsson; Norway by Snøhetta and Sweden by Gert Wingårdh.

Nordic Embassy Complex Berlin
Nordic Embassy Complex Berlin
Nordic Embassy Complex Berlin

This article is part of the Nordic Design: Now & Then series.
REDDRESS by Aamu Song

The ‘Reddress’ project was a unique collaboration between renowned Helsinki-based Korean designer Aamu Song, the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark and Kvadrat. It involved the creation of a huge, iconic, red dress, which formed the setting for an outdoor concert held at Louisiana.

Song created the dress using 550m of Kvadrat’s Divina fabric. The structure was over 4m tall and over 2m wide, including 238 ‘pockets’, which acted as seats for members of the audience.

Since the first installation, REDDRESS has evolved into a series of interactive installation indoor & outdoor.

REDDRESS by Aamu Song
REDDRESS by Aamu Song
REDDRESS by Aamu Song
REDDRESS by Aamu Song
REDDRESS by Aamu Song


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