• Deserted Airplane Graffiti
    The cemetery of disused war planes in Arizona are getting the world’s best urban artists paint on the ruined US Air Force jets, vividly bringing them back to life...
  • Kraft Paper Lounger
    Famed for their Paper Softwall which earned the permanent collection by the MoMA, Molo Studio is expanding the collection with a series of softseating...
  • TV Poster Series
    A series of modernist images inspired by TV shows created by converting some simple lines and shapes into very characteristic illustration...
  • Volim Honey Packaging
    A really nice and quality packaging design come from a far country, small producer such as Serbia...

Nordic design-Arne Jacobsen SAS Royal Hotel Room 606

The SAS Royal Hotel, built for the Scandinavian Airlines System in the 1960 is the first design hotel and often considered Arne Jocobsen's masterpiece. When the hotel was completed, it was the very first skycrapper in Copenhagen with 22 storeys of structures. A man for craftful work & fine details, Arne Jacobsen designed everything, from the high-rise structure to the organic-shaped Swan and Egg chair, the ashtrays, and the stainless steel cutlery used in the restaurant. 

Nordic design-Arne Jacobsen SAS Royal Hotel Room 606
Nordic design-Arne Jacobsen SAS Royal Hotel Room 606

50 years on and the SAS Royal Hotel is now the Radisson Blu Royal Hotel with completely redeveloped. Only Room 606 has been carefully preserved and remains identical to Jacobsen’s original commission. The Room 606 or Arne Jacobsen Suite,is a showcase for exquisite original Jacobsen décor from the 1960s. The colour palette includes greys, greens and blues, which perfectly complement the wenge wood details and representative furniture. The floor plan includes a sitting area, a large bathroom, separate small toilet and built-in makeup mirrors. It's a portal to the past, a room that has stopped in time, preserved for posterity while everything around it is changing. 

Room 606 is still open for booking at DKK 4900 (€655) per night, based upon two sharing, and includes breakfast.

This article is part of the Nordic Design: Now & Then.

Nordic design-Arne Jacobsen SAS Royal Hotel Room 606
Nordic design-Arne Jacobsen SAS Royal Hotel Room 606
Nordic design-Arne Jacobsen SAS Royal Hotel Room 606

Marimekko's Unikko 50th Anniversary

This year, Marimekko will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of Unikko. The Unikko story began in 1964 when Armi Ratia, Marimekko's founder, had announced that Marimekko would never print a floral pattern. Flowers should only bloom in nature, she said. In protest, designer Maija Isola created an entire collection of floral patterns. One of them was Unikko.

Marimekko's Unikko 50th Anniversary
Marimekko's Unikko 50th Anniversary
Marimekko's Unikko 50th Anniversary

The Unikko floral pattern embodied the spirit of the '60s flower revolution, and had plenty of provocative self-expression. Armi Ratia was immediately convinced that the print had a place at Marimekko. In the last 50 years, Unikko has reached all over the world with more than eighty unique colorways, with each conveying the mood and spirit of its own time.

Today Unikko floral pattern appears on fashion, fabric, tableware, wallpaper and numerous different medium.

Marimekko is one of the founders of finnish and nordic design. More than a brand or a style, Marimekko, founded in 1951 by the visionary Armi Ratia (1913-1979). Creativity has indeed always been central in Marimekko's activity, and new artists are invited each year to propose new designs. Meanwhile, the catalogue also offers former patterns from the 1950s up until today, which objective is less to follow fashion as to develop a timeless aesthetic. Marimekko’s colourful textiles for furniture and fashion design have since then been known all over the world and contributed to the 1950s – 1960s revolution of modern printed textiles and fashion design.

Marimekko's Unikko 50th Anniversary
Marimekko's Unikko 50th Anniversary

Marimekko's Unikko 50th Anniversary

Nordic Design- Nordic Landscape

Nordic design is different from Scandinavian design even we happily used the word 'Nordic' and 'Scandinavian' in an interchangeable manner. Scandinavia is a peninsula shared by Norway, Sweden and part of northern Finland. Meanwhile, the Nordic countries are composed of an official group called the Nordic Council, which includes Sweden, Norway and Denmark, along with Iceland and Finland, plus three autonomous regions: Faroe Islands, Greenland, and Åland Islands. Thus, the term “Nordic” is more all-inclusive for the style coming out of those countries in the northwest.

Nordic design, a style characterized by simplicity, minimalism and functionality. Emerging in the 1950s, Nordic design can be characterized by its simple, minimalist and functional qualities, best seen in the work of master designers such as Denmark's Arne Jacobsen, Hans J. Wagner, Verner Panton and Finland's Alvar Aalto. Lots of white. Lots of bright. Nordic design offers a homey, warm interior style with natural color amid the background of white, sand and grey. The interiors include bare or painted wide plank-wood floors, furniture manufactured from birch or pine and fabrics with minimal patterns in white-washed hues. Of course, one should also provide contrast by adding a few dark-colored objects. Too much colour will over power the design. Remember, Nordic interior design takes its cues from the neutral colour palette of surrounding landscapes.

Nordic Design- Arne Jacobsen Room 606
Arne Jacobsen SAS Royal Hotel Room 606, 1960 Nordic Design- Marimekko
Marimekko’s autumn 2014 collections

For centuries, Nordic life revolved around the home. In light of the cold climate and long dark winter, the home has to be a comfortable and cozy place. This led to good design combines beauty and functionality. The idea of beautiful and functional everyday objects should not only be affordable to the wealthy but to everyone.

An responsive understanding of their living environment has allowed the Nordic to use available resources sensibly and sparingly. The primary material is wood, followed by stone, clay, leather, metal, wool & furs. Nature has always been the mother of all Nordic design inspiration.

Shell Chair by Hans J. Wegner
The famous Shell Chair, 1963, by Hans J. Wegner PH Artichoke by Poul Henningsen
PH Artichoke lamp, 1958, by Poul Henningsen

The New Nordic design movement comprising a loose grouping of Scandinavian designers and creatives working towards a holistic integration of global and local approaches. Young Nordic designers — from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden — are trading bentwood and natural cottons for the rugged delights of industrial rubber and polypropylene. They created functional design with true feeling and passion, rather than via mass production. Usually design coming from the Nordic countries is characterized by a certain set of values - humanistic, democratic, organic - or so with the core concept of “beautiful things that make your life better”. From art, architecture and design, cuisine, fashion & entertainment, the new Nordic way has won over fans and followers everywhere, as figures such as the Swedish architecture firm Claesson Koivisto Rune , Icelandic-Danish artist Olafur Eliasson, Danish chef René Redzepi and Finnish firm Marimekko have risen to top of their fields.

Some notable Nordic prominent designer & company:

  • Arne Jacobsen's Radisson SAS Royal Hotel in Copenhagen is widely regarded as a masterpiece of Danish design. One room has been preserved in original sixties form. 
  • LEGO, which got its start in the thirties, takes its name from the Danish words leg godt, meaning "play well".
  • Bang & Olufsen, founded in 1925, became one of Denmark's greatest design exporters. Its 1964 slogan was "For those who discuss design and quality before price." The ethos remains unchanged today. 
  • Verner Panton, the king of mod, brought Denmark into the psychedelic sixties with funky, futuristic plastic furniture. 
  • Hans Wegner's most famous piece—simply called the Chair—became hugely popular after its use in the televised Kennedy-Nixon debates of 1960. 
  • Made of layers of steel leaves, Poul Henningsen's Artichoke ceiling lamp was made for the Langelinie Pavilion restaurant. 
  • Established in 1943 in the farming village of Agunnaryd, IKEA—with 200 stores in 33 countries—is the world's largest furniture retailer. 
  • When visiting Stockholm, don't miss SoFo, the area South of Folkungagatan, which has become the city's hot spot for cool design shops. 
  • Four young, hip women make up the design collective called Front, best known for the innovative "Animals" series.
  • Artek, still producing Alvar Aalto's furniture designs, was founded in 1935 by a group that included Aalto. 
  • This year, Marimekko's most iconic print Unikko (poppy) is celebrating its' 50 years anniversary.
Ceramics by Bjorn Wiinblad
Ceramic tableware, 2014, by Bjørn Wiinblad Nordic style bedroom
Raman House, 2000, by Claesson Koivisto Rune Kaleidoscope Project by Kaleidoscope Team
Kaleidoscope,2014: Hidden in the Woods. New housing, in variations of the Nordic courtyard house, is built around the existing building. Shared spaces, such as laundries, storages, hobby rooms, work and guest spaces, are placed in the old building. The most remote of the new houses are intended to be retreat-like guest cabins. Project: Kaleidoscope Team.
modern dining table

"LOCK" dinning table is designed out of the qualities, possibilities and characteristics of its highly sustainable wood on earth: BAMBOO. The frame is build up from layers of flexible bamboo. The layers are pressed together. The shape is formed by the bamboo's natural bending curve. The layers of bamboo curve through each other and entwine, locking each other in place. End result is a mix of nature and mathematics, of possible and impossible. A super strong masculine dynamic shape that looks different watched from different viewing points.

LOCK dinning table is designed by J.P.Meulendijks for Plankton.

LOCK modern dining table by Plankton
modern dining table design
modern dining table legs details


OMOTE 3D Real Time Face Tracking & Projection Mapping

Project OMOTE is a collaboration between Japanese 3D projection mapping specialist Nobumichi Asai, makeup artist Hiroto Kuwahara and French digital image engineer Paul Lacroix.

OMOTE, a system that combines motion tracking and projection mapping systems, projects computer graphics onto a seated model’s head allow Asai’s team to track and then accurately project visuals onto the subject’s face. After scanning, OMOTE then projects the computer graphics onto the person's face. The graphics are overlaid on all the contours of the person's face, and are manipulated to follow in real-time as the person moves.

Projecting computer graphics onto objects such as the sides of buildings or vehicles is not new, as many companies have used the technology in the past, often as a marketing gimmick but with this video, OMOTE has raised the bar.



Guardians of Time by Manfred Kielnhofer

Manfred Kielnhofer works as a painter, sculptor and photographer. Born in Austria, he has been working as an artist since 2000.

His recent sculptures, “Guardians of Time”, shows that since the beginning of time mankind has had protectors, both for historic and mystical reasons. It only seems that man himself is a potential source of danger for his own existence. In his works of art Kielnhofer deals with and looks into the natural human desire for feeling secure. Thus his oeuvre reflects genuine exploration, consideration and discussion of current as well as historic moods and sensibilities of his social environment. His works of art captivate with elaborate combinations of light and different materials.

Guardians of Time by Manfred Kielnhofer
Guardians of Time by Manfred Kielnhofer
Guardians of Time by Manfred Kielnhofer

Duffy London Abyss Table

Like all of Duffy London’s designs, the Abyss Coffee Table is a conversation piece as much as a functional one. But while previous works play with gravity, this new design is concerned with depth, and creates a geological cross-section as mesmerising as the sea.

Designer Christopher Duffy explains: 'I was looking into sheets of thick glass at my glass manufacturer's factory, and noticed how the material darkened as they added more layers - the same way the sea does as it deepens. I wanted to use this effect to replicate a real piece of the earth's sea bed. Like a mythical power had lifted a perfect rectangle straight from the earth's crust to use as his personal ornament.

The design team spent a year developing the table in their London studio, experimenting with sculpted glass, Perspex and wood, arranged like a 3-D representation of a geological map, until they re-created something of the mesmeric abyss that had first captured Duffy’s imagination. 

The Abyss Table is hand made to order in London from sustainable materials, and limited to an edition of 25.

Duffy London Abyss Coffee Table
Abyss Coffee Table
Duffy London Abyss Table
Duffy London Abyss Table
Duffy London Abyss Table
Maison de la Paix

Thanks to Matteograssi for sending us these photos of the Ivan Pictet auditorium with 700 seating units of the Kompass model, designed by EOOS, in black soft leather that they’ve proudly furnished.

The Maison de la Paix is the fruit of the consolidation of several conceptual ideas and projects that have been discussed in the past 15-20 years. Its central objective is to support and strengthen the relevance of “International Geneva” and to play an active role in helping the city to maintain and expand its longstanding identity and role as an international centre for diplomacy and dialogue in global peace and security affairs.

The state of the art architectural glass structure and premises of the Maison de la Paix, an outstanding glass building conceived in a 6-petal shaped design, located in the heart of the diplomatic quarter of Geneva, are ideally situated to house what is to become a global hub for innovative solutions to contemporary challenges to peace and security. The renowned French group of 16 architects IPAS is the brilliant talent behind such a masterpiece.

auditorium design
auditorium design
auditorium design by Matteograssi
auditorium design by Matteograssi
3D porcelain tiles

Heather Knight of elementclaystudio produces fine, hand made modern porcelain tableware and home decor.

This collection of 3-D textured wall tiles features nine different designs - Noni, Magnolia, Lichen, Hydrangea, Durian, Succulent, Reef, Fungi and Turf. A great accent piece against any background, from vibrant to neutral, these tiles are a great conversation starter. You could paint a square or stripe in a contrasting wall color to really make the tiles POP! Each tile is hand made with Helios Porcelain and left unglazed, highlighting the true beauty of the porcelain.

These tiles have been featured in Interior Design Magazine, May 2008, Issue 6 as well as many other national and international publications.

3D porcelain tiles
3D porcelain tiles
3D porcelain tiles
Handmade 3D porcelain tiles
Handmade 3D porcelain tiles

Visit Heather Etsy shop for more of her works.