• 1960s' Design MiniKitchen Get an Reissue from Boffi
    The Minikitchen is a re-issue of Joe Colombo's celebrated 1963 design, realised now in Corian® by Boffi . Joe Colombo's innovations has made him one of Italy's most influential designers...
  • Aquarium inside kitchen Island by Robert Kolenik
    Absolutely an eye catcher, this unique super-sized aquarium under the kitchen top will make the kitchen island the centre piece of the food talk...
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    NC Design & Architecture has been leading the new wave of makeover for McDonald's in Asia. The makeover is characterized by design elements inspired by local culture but with a modern interpretation...
  • Nuna- The Most Beautiful Popsicle You Will Ever Eat
    Nuna is a revolutionary popsicle with a faceted, almost architectural form mounted on a sustainable bamboo stick designed and manufactured by an international group of experts in design & food industry...
  • Nuna- The Most Beautiful Popsicle You Will Ever Eat
    Nuna is a revolutionary popsicle with a faceted, almost architectural form mounted on a sustainable bamboo stick designed and manufactured by an international group of experts in design & food industry...

The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute

Japan-based Daikoku Design Institute, lead by Daigo Daikoku art director cum designer has done some very engaging works since 2011. Daikoku Design Institute conducts creative work involving everything from two- and three-dimensional works to video and space design.

They are recipient of the JAGDA New Designer Award, the Tokyo ADC Prize and the D&AD Yellow Pencil Awards.

Have a look of their amazing works here:

The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
Etajima Jam
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
PRISTINE Identity
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
SOU・SOU Textile Design Collection 380 Patterns from Kyoto
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
HANGER YARN BALL|PRISTINE
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
Wasabi Dip
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
Handmade tofu of NOROSHI
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
MAU Water|Musashino Art University
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
A gift of SHUNJU
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
Hoshimochi (Butter,Yomogi)
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
PRISTINE Packaging
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
Potato shochu "Hokkaido Kiyosato"|Kiyosato Shouchu Office
The Designs of Daikoku Design Institute
MUJI Xmas Market 2011|MUJI


Flags of Peace

Flags of Peace is a continuous project by Trapped in Suburbia to explore ONE international recognizable peace flag.

Throughout history there have been several attempts to establish a universal peace flag and yet no single design has gained complete international acceptance.

This Flags of Peace project try to form a visual dialogue around peace and its indefinite symbolism. These flags will present a spectrum of ideas on peace. Each highlighting a particular nation’s relationship with, and view towards, international peace.

Flags of Peace aims to collect a flag design from each of the 196 countries in the world. Along this journey, international exhibitions will present the progress.

For the start, over forty reputable designers and artists, each from a different nation across the globe, were invited to propose a flag design, showing how they believe peace should be portrayed. The first showcase took place at De Pier, The Hague, over the Just Peace festival, International Day of Peace and Today’s Art.
Flags of Peace
Flags of Peace
Flags of Peace



Flags of Peace
Flags of Peace
Flags of Peace
Flags of Peace




The Egyptian Sibyl Wire Sculpture by Gavin Worth

"The Egyptian Sibyl," as a sculpture, resembles a freestanding line drawing. By bending over 100 steel rods by hand, Gavin Worth and four assistants constructed the piece over a 3-month period in the spring of 2014. The skies of Cairo is a wonderful canvas on which to draw with alternately blaring and soft, gentle and harsh, delicate blue and intense yellow. As the steel traces lines across the sky, the mood of the sculpture changes as the light does. When the sky is lit on fire with sunset yellows, oranges, and reds, the canvas for this vast drawing will be similarly vibrant. When the sky is overcast, softened, and pale with greys and blues, the canvas will be just as softened and meditative.


"The Egyptian Sibyl" is a monumental wire sculpture, over 20 feet in length, that is mounted on a rooftop in Cairo, Egypt. I built it at the end of a three year period living in Cairo -- a very tumultuous time that saw three different Presidents come and go. It was inspired by Michelangelo's painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. In this stunning work, Michelangelo depicts scenes from Genesis, prophets, as well as the Sibyls of antiquity. The Sibyls were women that possessed the power of prophecy and were found in the oracles of the ancient world. The Libyan Sibyl resided at the oracle in Siwa. The Delphic Sibyl was found at the oracle in Delphi, in Greece. The Sibyls were symbols of wisdom, of sensitivity, and intuition. Deeply inspired by this, I decided to create another Sibyl, the Egyptian Sibyl, to convey a similar feeling of freedom, knowledge, and vision. Flanked by papyrus flowers, she turns a page while gazing upward, enraptured in a moment of thought, light shining in her eyes. It is my sincere hope that the same sense of optimism, wisdom, and gentle freedom will guide Egypt towards its remarkable future.-- Gavin Worth

The Egyptian Sibyl Wire Sculpture by Gavin Worth
The Egyptian Sibyl Wire Sculpture by Gavin Worth
The Egyptian Sibyl Wire Sculpture by Gavin Worth


Makeover Camera Lens Cap

Somebody has found out that the Haagen-Dazs lid was the perfect fit to the lens of 72mm diameter (laughs).

So next time why waste money on a new lens cap? Instead buy a tub of Haagen-Dazs, you can enjoy the ice cream and still having a makeover lens cap.

Makeover Camera Lens Cap
Makeover Camera Lens Cap
Makeover Camera Lens Cap
Makeover Camera Lens Cap
Makeover Camera Lens Cap



Giant Octopus by Truly Design

Truly Design Visual Communication Studio unveiled a giant octopus, an anamorphic mural inside an industrial warehouse in Italy. A giant jungle green coloured octopus unraveled its eight tentacles over pillars and the ceiling throughout SAMO- Torino’s artistic hub. They used the space in a ingenious ways, with the beams and columns become the best ways to break up and join the octopus, making this optical illusion as tight as possible.


SAMO is an open space for open minds. SAMO is a space in constant transformation, marked by the seasonality of the products and the ephemeral nature of graffiti. While the concrete advances and the old barracks collapse, the art (of a different generation of artists) transforms a former industrial warehouse of 400sqm. into an art and cultural centre.

Giant Octopus by Truly Design
Giant Octopus by Truly Design
Giant Octopus by Truly Design
Giant Octopus by Truly Design
Giant Octopus by Truly Design
Giant Octopus by Truly Design


Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant

Koichi Yoshimura started the Sola Cube- 4x4 cm acrylic cubes that beautifully preserved the planet earth. The cubes not only preserved the plants, but also the colors and materials inside liquid acrylic. Sola cube encourage you to see the beauty of plant life, imagine its power, and become attuned to nature’s majesty. Inspired by Sola, you become more attuned to the natural beauty around you.

The name ‘Sola’ actually originates from the Chinese character kanji that means ‘universe’. According to Koichi Yoshimura, the Creative Director of Sola, this single character explains everything we know and don’t know, including time and space. Sola also has another meaning: “blue sky.” An imaginary world spreads out like the sky before us.

Every sola cube is carefully handmade by an experienced Japanese craftsman, and each one takes considerable time and effort to complete. Outstanding craftsmanship is required to ensure that this small transparent cube, which measures only 4cm, holds a plant at its very center and that no air bubbles get inside.

A summary of Sola cube manufacturing process:

STEP1 Foundation creation: In the first step of manufacturing, liquid acrylic is poured into a mold which is 5-6cm square, slightly larger than the sola cube. The dried plant is carefully inserted when the liquid hardens to a gel.

STEP2 Pressurization: Additional liquid acrylic is then poured into the mold. The mold is placed into a vacuum kiln, then pressurized to force out any air bubbles.

STEP3 Heat treatment: The product then undergoes a heat treatment. The cube is showered with hot air, at temperatures of 80 degrees for 3-4 hours. This stabilizes the binding of the acrylic, and ensures the cube is durable and long lasting.

STEP4 Processing: The cube is cut to precisely 4cm on each side, then planed. The corners are rounded and smoothed at the end of this step.

STEP5 Polishing: The surface of the cube is polished until it is shiny, and a clean, glossy finish is achieved.

Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant
Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant
Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant
Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant


Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant
Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant
Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant
Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant
Sola Cube- Preserved the Plant



PaperBridge by Steve Messam

PaperBridge by environmental artist Steve Messam.

PaperBridge is a temporary artwork made for and about the landscape of the Lake District, Grisedale Valley, Patterdale. On an aesthetic level the piece acts as a focal point within a vast open landscape. The bright red colour drawing the eye and interfering with the natural environment, while at the same time creating compositional balance with the green backdrop and flow of water.

Around 22,000 pieces of paper arch over a beck at the foot of the Helvellyn range in the English Lake District. The bridge weighed over 4 tonnes and could support the weight of 60 sheep (if you could fit that many on it), yet it didn’t use any glue, nuts, bolt, screws or any other fixings. It was just pure paper wedged between two cages of stone.

Paper is a simple material made from wood pulp and water. The materials have a resonance with the natural environment. All the paper used in PaperBridge will be recovered and returned to for recycling - re-pulping and made into new paper. This transparent cycle is part of the overall environmental narrative of the piece.

PaperBridge by Steve Messam
PaperBridge by Steve Messam
PaperBridge by Steve Messam
PaperBridge by Steve Messam
PaperBridge by Steve Messam
PaperBridge by Steve Messam